Field Notes from Self Isolation by Virginia Bertelli

Introduction : Crafting an attentiveness to the unspoken rhythms and textures of life is sociology’s most important gift to understanding cities. It’s noticing those remarkable things that often go unremarked upon and finding ways to record and honour what would otherwise be lost. As cities have emptied during the pandemic and citizens remain confined to … More Field Notes from Self Isolation by Virginia Bertelli

Field Notes: connecting with older generations at a distance during COVID-19 by Robin Skyer

Introduction : Crafting an attentiveness to the unspoken rhythms and textures of life is sociology’s most important gift to understanding cities. It’s noticing those remarkable things that often go unremarked upon and finding ways to record and honour what would otherwise be lost. As cities have emptied during the pandemic and citizens remain confined to … More Field Notes: connecting with older generations at a distance during COVID-19 by Robin Skyer

On Interviewing and Asylum-Seeking by May Mundt-Leach

Three weeks into the MSc in Social Research at Goldsmiths, University of London and it is quickly becoming clear that it is crucial to think outside the box when it comes to methodology – particularly if we aim to do research that is both sociable and actively inclusive. Looking for reading on innovative methods I was kindly given a copy of Migrant City, which provides detailed insight into collective ethnographic techniques with migrants … More On Interviewing and Asylum-Seeking by May Mundt-Leach

Becoming different together by Les Back

Vox Liminis is a project in Glasgow that challenges criminal justice and fosters communities through song writing and music  How do you imagine a new kind of life if you have served time in prison? How can music help people trying to walk that line out of prison to a free life?  In this podcast we visit an extraordinary project called Vox Liminis based in the Gallowgate, in … More Becoming different together by Les Back

Such a Gas, Gas, Gas by Alex Rhys Taylor

It’s 6.00am on Tuesday morning in the car park of a redbrick housing estate in Tower Hamlets. An empty bay is strewn with over fifty small, metallic gas canisters along with three flaccid party balloons, an empty packet of Capri Sun and a crushed bottle of Lilt. Everything empty. Before they were emptied, each small cannister had contained 8 grams of highly pressurised nitrous oxide. Later that day, Rosie Duffield MP appeared in … More Such a Gas, Gas, Gas by Alex Rhys Taylor

“Privatising Justice: The Security Industry, War and Crime Control” A book launch with Jennifer Fleetwood.

Book launch : Privatising Justice: The Security Industry, War and Crime Control by Wendy Fitzgibbon (University of Leicester) and John Lea (Visiting Professor, Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths).   On the 28th May 2020, we celebrated the publication of ‘Privatising justice: The Security Industry, War and Crime Control’ by Wendy Fitzgibbon (University of Leicester) and John Lea (Visiting … More “Privatising Justice: The Security Industry, War and Crime Control” A book launch with Jennifer Fleetwood.

Food Poverty and Charity in the UK: food banks, the food industry and the state. A report by Pat Caplan

What does food poverty mean to you?   Not having enough to eat, being malnourished, being hungry?  Not being able to eat foods which you want or which are good for your health?  All of these are part of definitions of food insecurity or food poverty.  Isn’t this just a part of being poor?  Yes and no. If you are … More Food Poverty and Charity in the UK: food banks, the food industry and the state. A report by Pat Caplan

Beating the bounds by Katherine Robinson

It’s now early summer, the time of year to beat the bounds. Beating the bounds is an ancient tradition in which people gather together to walk the boundaries of the local area, and in this way, re-establish rights of common land. It was a way of passing on local knowledge, a way of teaching children how to navigate their locality and a way of learning where you were from.  Beating the bounds can be … More Beating the bounds by Katherine Robinson

Police, race, punishment: New directions in Criminology. Seminar Series 2019-20 by Jennifer Fleetwood & Theo Kindynis,

Goldsmiths has long played a role in British scholarship on crime and justice. Professor Stuart Hall’s scholarship was, and remains, hugely influential in British criminology. Goldsmiths has also been home to well-known criminologists including Frances Heidensohn, Tim Newburn, Mike Shiner, Geoff Pearson, Tara Young and Jenni Ward – to name just a few. Building on the Sociology … More Police, race, punishment: New directions in Criminology. Seminar Series 2019-20 by Jennifer Fleetwood & Theo Kindynis,

Sick Cities, Ill Manners by Alex Rhys-Taylor

“London is deeply uncivilised now and public space has become uncouth. There has been a universal outbreak of incivility.”   Boris Johnson, Shadow (When Education Secretary, before becoming the Mayor of London, and later Prime Minister.)  From blogs, through tabloids to broadsheet op-eds, popular discourse about cities has long been strewn with treatise bemoaning the rudeness of twenty-first century cities life. We all know the complaints. Commuters pushing onto the train without letting that little … More Sick Cities, Ill Manners by Alex Rhys-Taylor